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Public Knowledge, Behaviors & Preferences about EnergyPublic Knowledge, Behaviors & Preferences about Energy

For the past three years, we have been asking Maryland residents questions about their understanding of the effects of climate change and their preferences for the state policies that fall under the umbrella of the GGRA. This year George Mason University partnered with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in fielding the survey. This report is one of three from the study; other reports highlight attitudes, behaviors and policy preferences on public health and climate change.

Published: October 25, 2015
PDF (2.44 MB)

Public Perceptions of Climate ChangePublic Perceptions of Climate Change

For the past three years, we have been asking Maryland residents questions about their understanding of the effects of climate change and their preferences for the state policies that fall under the umbrella of the GGRA. This year George Mason University partnered with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in fielding the survey. This report is one of three released from the 2015 data; other reports highlight attitudes, behaviors and policy preferences on energy, and public health and climate change.

Published: October 15, 2015
PDF (2.66 MB)

Executive Order

Executive Order 01.01.2014.14 Strengthening Climate Action in Maryland

For more information about the PROGRESS Maryland is making on climate change – click here

Published: November 19, 2014
PDF (6.1 MB)

public_perception_of_climate_change

Public Perceptions of Climate Change

The vast majority of Marylanders believe that climate change is happening, and that climate change should be a priority for the General Assembly and governor, according to a new survey report released by the Climate Communication Consortium of Maryland and George Mason University. “Public perceptions of climate change: A Maryland statewide survey” is one of four reports to be released this fall from a survey of more than 2,000 Maryland adults conducted this spring. The current report focuses on climate change beliefs and knowledge – such as state residents’ certainty that climate change is happening, and their understanding of the level of scientific consensus – and policy preferences, including Marylanders’ prioritization of climate change compared to other issues at the state level.

Published: October 28, 2014
PDF (2.4 MB)

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